Sports

Kingston fastpitch unshaken by non-league loss to CK

KINGSTON — The Kingston High fastpitch team began the 2010 season with a 9-0 loss to Central Kitsap Wednesday, but the Buccaneers were not disappointed with the game’s outcome.

Central Kitsap plays in the Class 4A Narrows League, while Kingston is a much smaller school, in the 2A Olympic League. The Bucs saw the game as a chance to face a tough opponent and see where they can grow.

“It wasn’t bad at all,” Kingston coach Joe Schiel said. “This is a great way to start. I would’ve loved to have won, but they (Kingston) were electric coming in here. They’re taking care of each other. This was just our ‘get ’em warmed up’ game.”

Cougar pitcher Kim Chase got the win, while Kingston sophomore Katie Lomas pitched all seven innings and recorded the loss.

Chase came out throwing heat Wednesday and struck out six batters in five innings. She allowed just two hits, one on an errant throw at first base. Central’s Ally Meigs pitched in relief during the sixth and seventh, striking out three and walking two, but allowing no hits.

“It was a great game,” CK head coach Bruce Welling said. “I’m pleased with where we’re at right now. I thought Kingston did well. But they’re young in some areas.”

Kingston’s varsity roster includes just two seniors and one junior this year. The bulk of the team is made up of sophomores and freshmen. Senior first baseman/pitcher Lauren Peiguss was pleased with the way her young teammates handled themselves against the formidable Cougars.

“They did really good for their first varsity game in high school,” she said.

Jordan Tapp, the team’s other senior, said the game exposed some areas where the Bucs need to grow if they wish to fair better against Olympic League opponents like Bremerton High, who they face Monday.

“We did good at batting, we just didn’t get it past the infield,” Tapp said. “But we were making contact the whole time, which was good. I was impressed with everyone.”

Schiel said the team’s youth makes for some challenges, but there are positives that come with such spryness.

“We’ve got a lot of speed,” Schiel said. “We can do well with small ball, but we have to calm down first. Once we’re calmed down, we’ll do a lot better.”

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