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Harrison in Poulsbo could be just what the doctor ordered

An aerial view of what Harrison Medical Center’s proposed campus would look like. The health care organization is currently negotiating with the city of Poulsbo to purchase the land. - Courtesy art
An aerial view of what Harrison Medical Center’s proposed campus would look like. The health care organization is currently negotiating with the city of Poulsbo to purchase the land.
— image credit: Courtesy art

Economic development committee talks up

benefits for Poulsbo.

POULSBO — The Viking City’s economic development committee couldn’t hold back its high hopes for Harrison Medical Center’s proposed future presence in Poulsbo.

The members of the committee Wednesday afternoon waxed enthusiastic about the possible addition to the State Route 305 corridor.

It could have a revitalizing effect elemental to sustainability, said Council Member Ed Stern. Efforts to bring the private, non-profit business to Poulsbo began in 2005. The “long-standing effort” could likely bring an estimated $25 million cancer center and urgent care facility to land on 10th Avenue previously designated for Poulsbo’s new city hall.

On an 18- to 24-month timeframe for completion, the structure would become an SR 305 landmark, adding medical options for residents of the North End and Bainbridge Island vicinity. The 50,000-square-foot campus would sit on seven acres near Powder Hill.

Stern said the high-skill, high-paying jobs and increased fees and tax revenues to the city would be welcome additions to the city’s economy.

“All of that together spells sustainability,” he said. “Something like this is manifold to the community.”

The city still needs to conduct a fair market value appraisal of the land before the purchase process moves forward.

Harrison Vice President of Strategy and Business Development Tom Kruse, who later spoke at the city’s council meeting, said the addition is one that could help Poulsbo “grow into a very regional hub and destination.”

He outlined the building’s possible schematics for the council, which he said are similar to previous city hall plans due to the property’s wetlands.

Becky Erickson said the positives of Harrison’s presence are plenty.

“It’s year-round kind of jobs that we want. Not only that, it’s a tremendous service for the community,” she said. “This could be a real cornerstone for our community.”

Committee member Kim Crowder summed it up neatly.

“Plus, plus, plus,” she said.

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