News

This day in history: Cinco de Mayo and Mexico's defeat of French troops at Puebla

Tloke Nahuake, the Salinas family dance circle from Mexico City, wowed the crowds with a performance of the ancient Aztec fire dance Aug. 19, 2012 at the Chief Seattle Days pow wow, at the Suquamish Nation’s Port Madison Reservation. Joanna Salinas said Tloke Nahuake, which means “Together United” in Nahuatl, travels extensively to share traditional dances that have been passed down from generation to generation in the Salinas family.  - Richard Walker
Tloke Nahuake, the Salinas family dance circle from Mexico City, wowed the crowds with a performance of the ancient Aztec fire dance Aug. 19, 2012 at the Chief Seattle Days pow wow, at the Suquamish Nation’s Port Madison Reservation. Joanna Salinas said Tloke Nahuake, which means “Together United” in Nahuatl, travels extensively to share traditional dances that have been passed down from generation to generation in the Salinas family.
— image credit: Richard Walker

POULSBO — Cinco de Mayo is to Mexican-Americans what Norway's Constitution Day is to Americans of Norwegian ancestry.

It was on May 5, 1862 that Mexican troops, outnumbered 3-1, defeated the French at the Battle of Puebla. France was successful in a subsequent battle and installed a monarch, but the resistance led by Mexico's indigenous Zapotec president, Benito Juarez, ultimately prevailed. France withdrew from Mexico in 1867 and Austrian Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian — who had been installed as Emperor Maximilian I — was captured and executed. Juarez restored the Republic of Mexico and modernized his country.

An increasing number of Poulsbo residents are observing the day: 9.2 percent of Poulsbo's population is of Mexican ancestry, according to the U.S. Census. Poulsbo's population was 9,393 in 2010, according to the Census.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the Nov 28
Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Browse the archives.

Friends to Follow

View All Updates