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Kingston's SK8 Rollick is fruition of 10-year dream for Kitsap duo

The first of its kind, the SK8 Rollick kicks of Saturday at noon.  - Poster art by Dan McDougall
The first of its kind, the SK8 Rollick kicks of Saturday at noon.
— image credit: Poster art by Dan McDougall

KINGSTON — Nothing beats the realization of a dream.

Especially a dream that’s been 10 years in the making.

On Saturday, fantasy will come to fruition for two locals imbedded in the North End’s alternative culture, as Dan McDougall, 23, of Kingston and Bill Mickelson, 22, of Bremerton, host Kingston’s first skate competition and concert.

On Saturday from noon to 7:30 p.m. McDougall and Mickelson showcase SK8 Rollick, the county’s first skate event held with actual permission at the Billy Johnson Skate Park, 26200 Lindvog Road NE, Kingston.

The event will be a feast for the eyes and ears, as it combines a spectrum of skateboarding skills with the beats of local bands.

“People can look forward to some very impressive skateboarding, lots of people having fun and showing their skills,” said Kingston native McDougall.

The competition kicks off at 12 p.m. and McDougall estimates approximately 50 skater boys — and girls — ages 8 to mid-30s from around the county and the east side to heat up the cement. Each rollicker will have 1 minute, 45 seconds to strut their stuff. And yes, there will be prizes.

The competition will be judged by five home-grown skate park regulars — Dan McDougall, Matt McDougall, Kes Anderson, Peter Wickstrom and John Perry — who were instrumental in raising money and awareness to get the park built.

They’ll be watching for multiple tricks landed and multiple elements used in a row.

Competition runs until 4 p.m. and then it’s time to jam.

Four bands and two deejays will take the stage for hour-long sets. Patrons can enjoy the flavors of rock and roll, punk rock, hip hop and indie music.

“It’s a something-for-everyone type of events schedule,” Mickelson said. “It’s an amalgamation of different styles hopefully all coming together over a common idea.”

Realizing the Rollick

While today will prove to be a rip-roarin’ rollicking good time, it’s also a time for McDougall and Mickelson to bask in the beauty of a dream becoming reality.

McDougall and his buddies grew up skating on hand-built ramps, as there wasn’t a park in Kingston.

They wanted a skate venue of their own.

In 1998, then Kingston Junior High history teacher Deborah MacKinnon gave them the tools necessary to get one.

MacKinnon helped the boys organize a skate club.

“I though it was awesome,” McDougall said. “She pulled us out of everybody and saw how much drive we had and how it was possible for us to do this even though we were 12 and 13 years old.”

All through their junior high years they raised money, informed residents that Kingston needed a skate park and mailed thousands of letters asking for donations.

In 2000 Kingston got a park.

“Something we thought was never possible in Kingston became possible,” said McDougall, who licked more than 10,000 donation request envelopes to help secure funding for the park.

Once the park was built, the skate club boys started to dream big again. They wanted to organize and host a skate competition.

“We’ve had an idea to do it since the park was built,” McDougall said. “It was like, ‘Oh, one day we’ll be able to have a contest here and we’ll judge it,’ and the time has finally come.”

But first the local rail riders needed a little assistance from Mickelson, a local entertainment writer and guitarist for the band Triple Forte.

The first concert Mickelson ever played was at a skate park. He said alternative music and skating have always seemed to mesh. When he moved to the Northwest from Wyoming, he thought he’d see a lot more meshing going on. But he didn’t. Something needed to change.

Mickelson approached McDougall with an idea to host a joint skate competition and musical throwdown. McDougall agreed; and said “Kingston for sure.” “I’ve wanted to arrange an event for a long time,” Mickelson said. “We made it happen because the right people came together. It just took a little bit of gumption.”

Once again McDougall and crew, accompanied by Mickelson, beat the pavement and jumped through hoops to make magic happen at Kingston’s park. The duo and judges secured a Kitsap County Parks and Recreation permit, they’ve designed and hung event posters throughout local communities and they’ve worked in conjunction with local businesses for donations.

Sponsors jumped onboard, including Randy Kan, Northernwave, Snowboard Connection, Systemix Apparel, Chinook Properties, Gordon Sound, Kitsap County Parks and Recreation and Kitsap Sports.

For the teenagers who snuck in to ride their park before the tape was even cut, today represents much more than a skate competition.

“We’ve probably skated at the park more than anyone and we’ve all been boarding for years so it’s kind of like we want to see what people can do at Kingston park,” McDougall said. “I just want the generation now growing up and skating there every day to appreciate it a lot more and how hard we had to work for it.”

They would like to make the Rollick an annual happening, but first they’ll test the wheels and strings today. And if today goes anything like the feedback they’ve heard a yearly rollick just might be penciled in ink.

“I’ve heard excitement all over the county, it definitely sounds like something people are excited about,” Mickelson said. “The event made it possible. People showed interest because there’s going to be a skate concert.”

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