News

New boat launch floats with fisherman

HANSVILLE — After five hours of public comment last week from Kitsap County’s fishing community, the design results for a new boat launch at Point No Point Beach Resort were impressive, even to the staunchest of fishermen.

The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife held an in depth informational session Oct. 11 with residents who were concerned with the fate of the popular fishing hole.

The resort’s nearly 80-year-old rail system boat launch was deemed unsafe by the state in January 2002 and closed.

While the recreational vehicle park and cabins are still operational and caretakers Sharon and Vic Nelson reside on the property, the two-acre resort is in badly need of repairs, emphasized WDFW staff and the Nelsons during several meetings held in the past year.

When the state shut down the launch, WDFW started working with the public to discuss how the resort could be redeveloped. Fish and Wildlife staff members took comments from nearly 70 people Thursday about possible improvements.

Jerry Ressa, a principal architect with Pacific Design Group in Spokane, then spent the next day and a half designing a new resort with the public comments in mind. He presented his ideas Saturday afternoon at the Hansville Community Center.

Ressa said the new boat launch was designed to be similar to the existing amenity. With it, boaters would be able to drive up to the deck between the boat warehouse and launch and a crane would be attached to boats and lift them off trailers. Boats would be turned 90-degrees and would be set on the new rail launch, where they would be lowered into the water. Trailers would then be parked behind the boat warehouse, which would be enlarged for additional boat storage.

Because no one commented on retaining or removing the cabins at the resort on Thursday, Ressa said he removed them from his plan to make room for boat trailer parking.

For the main building and caretakers’ home, Ressa said the front portion of the building could be redeveloped into a cafe or restaurant. His plans also added an outside deck, where customers could sit and watch the boat launch and the water traffic.

The rear portion of the building would be expanded to include an interpretive or education center.

Ressa’s proposal retained the RV park but redesigned it to include 30 stalls for both small and large RVs.

Near the entrance of the resort, Ressa’s plan also added about 40 parking spots for cars. He also said that sprucing up the entrance to the resort would increase the market value of the property and make it more inviting.

“I tried to balance it out,” Ressa said, noting that he had about two acres to work with. “I recognize there isn’t going to be enough space but hopefully it will have enough for a response to the need.”

While the drawing was bright and colorful, the lingering question was how to fund the redevelopment.

Ressa strongly suggested the next step be to develop a business plan for the resort, which he said would be an asset when seeking grant monies. With such a plan, possible funding sources would be more apt to give money, he explained.

“We need to start putting hand to paper to start designating funding sources,” said WDFW regional director Sue Patnude. “Now we have an idea of where we want to go, we need to focus on the business plan.”By TIFFANY ROYAL

Staff Writer

HANSVILLE — After five hours of public comment last week from Kitsap County’s fishing community, the design results for a new boat launch at Point No Point Beach Resort were impressive, even to the staunchest of fishermen.

The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife held an in depth informational session Oct. 11 with residents who were concerned with the fate of the popular fishing hole.

The resort’s nearly 80-year-old rail system boat launch was deemed unsafe by the state in January 2002 and closed.

While the recreational vehicle park and cabins are still operational and caretakers Sharon and Vic Nelson reside on the property, the two-acre resort is in badly need of repairs, emphasized WDFW staff and the Nelsons during several meetings held in the past year.

When the state shut down the launch, WDFW started working with the public to discuss how the resort could be redeveloped. Fish and Wildlife staff members took comments from nearly 70 people Thursday about possible improvements.

Jerry Ressa, a principal architect with Pacific Design Group in Spokane, then spent the next day and a half designing a new resort with the public comments in mind. He presented his ideas Saturday afternoon at the Hansville Community Center.

Ressa said the new boat launch was designed to be similar to the existing amenity. With it, boaters would be able to drive up to the deck between the boat warehouse and launch and a crane would be attached to boats and lift them off trailers. Boats would be turned 90-degrees and would be set on the new rail launch, where they would be lowered into the water. Trailers would then be parked behind the boat warehouse, which would be enlarged for additional boat storage.

Because no one commented on retaining or removing the cabins at the resort on Thursday, Ressa said he removed them from his plan to make room for boat trailer parking.

For the main building and caretakers’ home, Ressa said the front portion of the building could be redeveloped into a cafe or restaurant. His plans also added an outside deck, where customers could sit and watch the boat launch and the water traffic.

The rear portion of the building would be expanded to include an interpretive or education center.

Ressa’s proposal retained the RV park but redesigned it to include 30 stalls for both small and large RVs.

Near the entrance of the resort, Ressa’s plan also added about 40 parking spots for cars. He also said that sprucing up the entrance to the resort would increase the market value of the property and make it more inviting.

“I tried to balance it out,” Ressa said, noting that he had about two acres to work with. “I recognize there isn’t going to be enough space but hopefully it will have enough for a response to the need.”

While the drawing was bright and colorful, the lingering question was how to fund the redevelopment.

Ressa strongly suggested the next step be to develop a business plan for the resort, which he said would be an asset when seeking grant monies. With such a plan, possible funding sources would be more apt to give money, he explained.

“We need to start putting hand to paper to start designating funding sources,” said WDFW regional director Sue Patnude. “Now we have an idea of where we want to go, we need to focus on the business plan.”By TIFFANY ROYAL

Staff Writer

HANSVILLE — After five hours of public comment last week from Kitsap County’s fishing community, the design results for a new boat launch at Point No Point Beach Resort were impressive, even to the staunchest of fishermen.

The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife held an in depth informational session Oct. 11 with residents who were concerned with the fate of the popular fishing hole.

The resort’s nearly 80-year-old rail system boat launch was deemed unsafe by the state in January 2002 and closed.

While the recreational vehicle park and cabins are still operational and caretakers Sharon and Vic Nelson reside on the property, the two-acre resort is in badly need of repairs, emphasized WDFW staff and the Nelsons during several meetings held in the past year.

When the state shut down the launch, WDFW started working with the public to discuss how the resort could be redeveloped. Fish and Wildlife staff members took comments from nearly 70 people Thursday about possible improvements.

Jerry Ressa, a principal architect with Pacific Design Group in Spokane, then spent the next day and a half designing a new resort with the public comments in mind. He presented his ideas Saturday afternoon at the Hansville Community Center.

Ressa said the new boat launch was designed to be similar to the existing amenity. With it, boaters would be able to drive up to the deck between the boat warehouse and launch and a crane would be attached to boats and lift them off trailers. Boats would be turned 90-degrees and would be set on the new rail launch, where they would be lowered into the water. Trailers would then be parked behind the boat warehouse, which would be enlarged for additional boat storage.

Because no one commented on retaining or removing the cabins at the resort on Thursday, Ressa said he removed them from his plan to make room for boat trailer parking.

For the main building and caretakers’ home, Ressa said the front portion of the building could be redeveloped into a cafe or restaurant. His plans also added an outside deck, where customers could sit and watch the boat launch and the water traffic.

The rear portion of the building would be expanded to include an interpretive or education center.

Ressa’s proposal retained the RV park but redesigned it to include 30 stalls for both small and large RVs.

Near the entrance of the resort, Ressa’s plan also added about 40 parking spots for cars. He also said that sprucing up the entrance to the resort would increase the market value of the property and make it more inviting.

“I tried to balance it out,” Ressa said, noting that he had about two acres to work with. “I recognize there isn’t going to be enough space but hopefully it will have enough for a response to the need.”

While the drawing was bright and colorful, the lingering question was how to fund the redevelopment.

Ressa strongly suggested the next step be to develop a business plan for the resort, which he said would be an asset when seeking grant monies. With such a plan, possible funding sources would be more apt to give money, he explained.

“We need to start putting hand to paper to start designating funding sources,” said WDFW regional director Sue Patnude. “Now we have an idea of where we want to go, we need to focus on the business plan.”By TIFFANY ROYAL

Staff Writer

HANSVILLE — After five hours of public comment last week from Kitsap County’s fishing community, the design results for a new boat launch at Point No Point Beach Resort were impressive, even to the staunchest of fishermen.

The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife held an in depth informational session Oct. 11 with residents who were concerned with the fate of the popular fishing hole.

The resort’s nearly 80-year-old rail system boat launch was deemed unsafe by the state in January 2002 and closed.

While the recreational vehicle park and cabins are still operational and caretakers Sharon and Vic Nelson reside on the property, the two-acre resort is in badly need of repairs, emphasized WDFW staff and the Nelsons during several meetings held in the past year.

When the state shut down the launch, WDFW started working with the public to discuss how the resort could be redeveloped. Fish and Wildlife staff members took comments from nearly 70 people Thursday about possible improvements.

Jerry Ressa, a principal architect with Pacific Design Group in Spokane, then spent the next day and a half designing a new resort with the public comments in mind. He presented his ideas Saturday afternoon at the Hansville Community Center.

Ressa said the new boat launch was designed to be similar to the existing amenity. With it, boaters would be able to drive up to the deck between the boat warehouse and launch and a crane would be attached to boats and lift them off trailers. Boats would be turned 90-degrees and would be set on the new rail launch, where they would be lowered into the water. Trailers would then be parked behind the boat warehouse, which would be enlarged for additional boat storage.

Because no one commented on retaining or removing the cabins at the resort on Thursday, Ressa said he removed them from his plan to make room for boat trailer parking.

For the main building and caretakers’ home, Ressa said the front portion of the building could be redeveloped into a cafe or restaurant. His plans also added an outside deck, where customers could sit and watch the boat launch and the water traffic.

The rear portion of the building would be expanded to include an interpretive or education center.

Ressa’s proposal retained the RV park but redesigned it to include 30 stalls for both small and large RVs.

Near the entrance of the resort, Ressa’s plan also added about 40 parking spots for cars. He also said that sprucing up the entrance to the resort would increase the market value of the property and make it more inviting.

“I tried to balance it out,” Ressa said, noting that he had about two acres to work with. “I recognize there isn’t going to be enough space but hopefully it will have enough for a response to the need.”

While the drawing was bright and colorful, the lingering question was how to fund the redevelopment.

Ressa strongly suggested the next step be to develop a business plan for the resort, which he said would be an asset when seeking grant monies. With such a plan, possible funding sources would be more apt to give money, he explained.

“We need to start putting hand to paper to start designating funding sources,” said WDFW regional director Sue Patnude. “Now we have an idea of where we want to go, we need to focus on the business plan.”

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