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9-year-old boy airlifted after bicycle/car collision in Suquamish

SUQUAMISH — A 9-year-old boy was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center after he was struck by a car while riding his bicycle.

Suquamish Police officers and North Kitsap Fire & Rescue engine and medic units went to the intersection of Brockton Avenue NE and NE Plum Street after a 6:21 p.m. 9-1-1 broadcast about a motor vehicle striking a young boy riding a bicycle.

The boy was treated at the scene and then taken by medic unit to Suquamish Elementary School, where he was airlifted to Harborview.

A preliminary analysis by sheriff’s traffic investigators indicates that the boy was heading eastbound on Plum Street when he entered into the intersection with Brockton Avenue. The boy was not wearing a bicycle safety helmet, sheriff’s spokesman Scott Wilson said.

“According to witnesses, the bicyclist didn’t stop for the stop sign and entered the intersection directly in front of a 1996 Subaru Impreza traveling northbound on Brockton Avenue,” Wilson wrote in a press release. “The boy was struck before the driver could stop.”

The boy sustained head and leg injuries from colliding with the Subaru’s hood and windshield.

The vehicle was driven by a woman, age 50, also a Suquamish resident. There were no other occupants.

The woman wasn’t injured and had been wearing a seatbelt. There is no indication the driver was under the influence, and excessive vehicle speed is not a factor, Wilson said.

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